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Daffodil Bulb – a highly toxic powerhouse

Daffodil Bulb – a highly toxic powerhouse

Daffodils – everyone knows the bright yellow heralds of spring. Some are so fond of them that they plant them themselves in the garden or a pot in the apartment. But few people know essential facts about the bulb of this plant.

The bulb is the energy storage center of the Daffodil

The onion is the plant’s powerhouse and energy storage center. With it, the daffodil survives in the ground for many years. Every year between February and March it sprouts again and produces flowers. This would not be possible without the work of the onion.

 Potted daffodils need to be fertilized regularly throughout their growing season. Even outdoors, daffodils should be supplied with moderate amounts of fertilizer, for example, in the form of compost. Otherwise, the bulb will soon deplete the soil and die due to lack of nutrients.

Do not cut off the Daffodil leaves too early, otherwise, the bulb will suffer

After flowering, the bulb absorbs nutrients from the leaves. Therefore, the leaves should not be cut off too early. Do not cut off the leaves until they have yellowed, if at all.

Where does a daffodil bulb grow best?

When planting a daffodil bulb, a sunny to partially shaded spot should be chosen. The substrate should have the following characteristics:

  • permeable
  • humorous
  • nutritious
  • lime-free
  • humid environment

Warning: Onion is highly toxic!

Pay attention! The daffodil bulb is highly toxic. Just 1 onion can make the difference between life and death for a person. Even pets are not immune to their poison. Especially when storing the onions, be careful not to put them together with kitchen onions. The risk of confusion is great.

One makes many: After a short time, onions grow

A single onion is already suitable for propagation. It forms bulbs underground, which can be dug up after flowering and planted elsewhere. If you don’t separate the bulbs from each other, you run the risk that the daffodils will soon stop blooming due to a lack of nutrients.

Tips

Wear gloves when handling the poisonous daffodil bulb and keep them away from pets and young children!

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic