Home » Gerbera as a Houseplant – How To Care For Them

Gerbera as a Houseplant – How To Care For Them

Gerbera as a Houseplant - How To Care For Them

Gerbera is not only very popular as a cut flower or in the garden. It is also very popular as a houseplant. However, maintenance is not that easy. A bit of sensitivity is required if the gerbera is to unfold its full bloom.

The right location for the potted plant

The gerbera is a small mimosa . It does not thrive in an unfavorable location. It would like to be very bright, but direct midday sun is not right for it either.

Do not place the houseplant too close behind the glass pane of the flower window. This prevents the glass from acting like a magnifying glass on the flowers and leaves when exposed to sunlight.

The gerbera likes moist soil but needs enough space for air to circulate between the leaves.

Cut dead flowers immediately

To stimulate the formation of new flowers, you must always cut off faded inflorescences immediately. Cut the stems about an inch above the soil surface.

Leaves that are wilting, discoloring or showing spots should also be trimmed.

Watch out for pests like lice, spider mites, and beetroot flea beetles, and get rid of them as soon as possible.

Water the gerbera properly

  • Soil moist but not wet
  • Only water the gerbera from below
  • Pour off excess water
  • Spray more frequently in summer

Watering is the biggest care issue for gerberas. It tolerates neither too much nor too little moisture. It must never dry out completely.

You should never water the plant from above, only from below. Add water to the saucer or occasionally dip the potted plant in a bucket of water.

Bring outdoors in summer

If you want to do something good for your gerbera, place the potted plant on the terrace or balcony in summer.

Outside, it gets enough light and air and thanks you with lots of colorful flowers.

But make sure that the plant does not get direct midday sun.

Tips 

Gray mold can be fatal for the gerbera as a potted plant. It occurs when the plants are too dense and kept too moist. Make sure there is enough distance to walls and other plants.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic