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Growing Gerberas in The Garden – Tips

Growing Gerberas in The Garden - Tips

Gerbera not only provides decorative color accents on the window sill or the balcony. The pretty tropical plant can also be kept well in the garden. Either cultivate them as annual flowering plants or overwinter gerberas indoors.

Garden gerberas – more robust than indoor plants

Gerberas often do better outdoors than indoors on the window sill. Outside it gets enough air and light and thanks you with a rich bloom.

Unfortunately, most gerbera varieties are not hardy. Because of this, most gardeners only keep the flower as an annual and replant it every spring.

An alternative is the hardy variety “Garnivea”, which is available in many colors and sizes. It is conditionally hardy and withstands temperatures down to minus five degrees. It is advisable to choose a sheltered location and cover the plants in winter.

How to plant gerberas in the garden

  • Choose a bright, warm location
  • Avoid direct midday sun
  • loosen soil
  • Refine with compost
  • Do not plant plants too deeply
  • press earth
  • Keep well moist, avoid waterlogging
  • Fertilize once a month

The plants are planted so deep in the ground that the crown of the roots remains on the surface. The planting distance to other plants should be at least 50 centimeters (19 inches). Gerbera develops quite large leaves that need their space.

Make sure that the potting soil is always slightly moist but never wet. Always water the gerbera from below.

Keeping gerberas in the garden perennial

Since most varieties are not hardy, you will need to dig them up in the fall. To do this, cut out the root ball generously and place the plant in a pot.

Overwinter the gerbera in a bright place where temperatures are between 12 and a maximum of 15 degrees (53 -59F). During hibernation, it is enough to give a little water once or twice a month. There is no fertilization.

The gerbera can be put back in the garden next year after the ice saints at the end of May.

Tips 

The soil in your garden is very solid, but you don’t want to do without gerberas in the flower bed? Create a raised bed! Moisture cannot accumulate in a raised bed and all plants get plenty of light and warmth.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic