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Nasturtium seeds – Purchase, Sowing & Use

Nasturtium seeds - Purchase, Sowing & Use

Nasturtium is not only very decorative and tasty, but it also has medicinal ingredients that are often used to treat inflammation of the upper respiratory tract or urinary tract infections. The leaves, buds, flowers, and seeds of the plant are edible.

Where can you get seeds for nasturtium?

You can buy nasturtium seeds in supermarkets or nurseries, but you can also order them by mail order or online. However, if you are looking for a special variety or an unusual flower color, then you should look around in specialist shops. There you will also find, for example, nasturtiums with black, white, or pink flowers.

Can you grow nasturtium from your own seeds?

You can grow nasturtium relatively easily from your own seeds. When collecting the seeds, be sure to dry them thoroughly so they don’t start to get moldy. Stored dark and dry, you can then keep the seeds until next spring.

Sowing nasturtiums

You can sow nasturtiums outdoors directly at the spot where you want them to stay. However, you should wait until mid-May and only sow after the ice saints, because the nasturtium is not frost-hardy. It likes it sunny and warm, but also tolerates shade.

Put the seeds individually or in pairs in small holes in the ground and cover them with about one to two centimeters of soil. Always keep the seeds moist during the germination period. After about 10 to 20 days, the first seedlings should be visible.

Are nasturtium seeds edible?

The seeds of the nasturtium are edible. Like the other parts of the plant, they taste spicy and slightly hot. If they’re still immature and soft, you can pickle the seeds as a substitute for capers, as can the unopened buds.

Briefly boil the seeds in a broth of vinegar, salt, and water. Pour this mixture into a clean twist-off jar, while still hot, to just under the brim and seal tightly immediately. If you keep the jar dark and cool, your fake capers will keep for several months or even years.

You can also let the seeds ripen and then dry them. Stored in a cool, dry, and dark place, they will keep for a few months. They are excellent to grind in a spice grinder or mortar, then you can use them to flavor your dishes deliciously.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic