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Propagating Foxglove – Tips & Care

Propagating Foxglove - Tips & Care

Foxglove – a biennial garden flower that requires little care. Anyone who gets to know and love them should rather count on self-grown plants. These are cheaper than purchased copies. But how can the foxglove be multiplied without complications?

Controlled sowing of Foxglove

Commercial seed packs usually contain between 80 and 500 Foxglove seeds. With a single pack, wide sowing is guaranteed. Sowing foxgloves is usually uncomplicated. The procedure can be performed in seed pots or trays at home.

When, where, and how to start sowing?

The seeds are sown in spring or summer. It is enough to sow them in summer, between July and August, since foxgloves only bloom in the second year. Foxgloves are planted out no later than six weeks after sowing .

Whether in a seed tray, in a pot, in a bed, or elsewhere, the seeds germinate well. They can be grown indoors or sown directly outdoors. Ambient temperatures between 15 and 18 °C (59-64F) are best.

How to proceed:

  • Mix seeds with sand
  • Scatter seeds or sow in a container
  • Either cover the seeds very thinly with soil or press them onto the soil
  • moisten with a hose with fine gland or hand sprayer
  • Germination time: 2 weeks
  • prick out after 3 weeks

Self-sowing foxglove

If the seed pods are round and green, the seeds are immature. When ripe, the seed pods open at the top. The seeds come out of the opening and can easily be carried away by the wind.

As a result, self-sowing takes place without any problems. However, you should note one thing: If you do not want the plant to self-seed, cut off the flower stalks in early autumn.

Tips

If you plan to harvest and store the seeds, proceed with care. Cut off the entire infructescence in the fall and shake out the seeds over a piece of newspaper. That way not too many seeds are lost in the world.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic