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Propagating Nasturtium – Best Tips

Propagating Nasturtium - Best Tips

The propagation of nasturtium is relatively easy. You have various options for doing this. You can take cuttings to grow genetically identical plants or use seeds to try out new breeds.

Propagation by cuttings

Cut a fresh shoot of your nasturtium about 15 cm (5.7 inches) long and place it in a pot with moist potting soil. Always keep this soil moist, but do not allow it to become waterlogged, otherwise, the shoot will start to get moldy.

Place the seed pot in a warm place. A cultivation temperature of 20 – 25 °C (68-77 F) is ideal. After about a week, the first small roots have formed. You can wait until the roots are a little stronger before planting.

propagation by lowering

Propagation by cuttings works similarly to propagation by cuttings. In this case, however, the separation from the mother plant takes place only after root formation. You will again need a healthy nasturtium and a pot with potting soil and a good drainage layer.

Place the pot under a lowered shoot and weigh this shoot down with a stone. Water the plant part in the pot as regularly as before. Even when lowering, the first fine roots should form within about a week.

Sowing the nasturtiums

The easiest way of propagation is certainly sowing. Here you have the choice between the seeds of your own plants and purchased seeds. From mid-May after the ice saints, you can sow directly outdoors. Sowing in pots is possible from March.

Put 2-3 seeds together in a pot or in a planting hole. Cover the seeds with soil, because the nasturtium belongs to the dark germs. The ideal germination temperature is around 20 – 25 °C (68-77 F). Then the first seedlings appear after about a week, at cooler temperatures it takes a little longer.

Tips

Plants that are genetically identical to the original plant can only be obtained from cuttings, not from seeds.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic