Home » Proper fertilizing of the nasturtium- How, When & With what

Proper fertilizing of the nasturtium- How, When & With what

Proper fertilizing of the nasturtium- How, When & With what

The nasturtium is one of the rather easy-care and uncomplicated plants. At the right location and with enough space, it only needs enough water to thrive. fertilizer is not necessary in this case.

If the nasturtium gets too much fertilizer, then it only forms leaves, but no or only a few flowers. So if you expect a rich bloom from your plant, then you should not “spoil” it too much, but rather keep it sparse. It likes poor, slightly calcareous soil, which can be a little loamy or sandy, but not too moist.

How and when should nasturtium be fertilized?

Outdoors, nasturtiums should only be fertilized when the soil is extremely poor, otherwise, a little well-rotted compost in spring and regular watering in summer will suffice. However, if you have decided to plant your nasturtium in a bucket on the terrace or balcony, then it will need a little more care and attention.

You also have the choice between different growth forms for nasturtiums for planting in containers, from bushy and compact to lush tendrils. Depending on which growth form you have chosen, the nutrient requirements of the plant are of course also very different. This cannot always be adequately regulated by the pot size and the amount of soil available.

If your nasturtium is only used as an ornamental plant, you can give it a small dose of semi-concentrated liquid fertilizer every month. If you like it very comfortable, then use fertilizer sticks according to the instructions on the packet.

However, if you want to eat your nasturtium or parts of it, then you should use natural fertilizers or regularly work a small amount of compost under the ground.

The essentials in brief:

  • outdoors, compost is sufficient in the spring
  • Fertilize potted plants sparingly
  • pour copiously
  • Avoid waterlogging
  • no chemical fertilizer for crops

Tips 

Be sparing with the fertilizer. If you fertilize too much, your nasturtium will no longer produce flowers, but fewer.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic