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Sowing The Foxglove – This is how it’s done

Sowing The Foxglove - This is how it's done

Sowing foxgloves – not an easy task, ignorant gardeners might claim. But is it really like that? Under what conditions does sowing succeed, when is the right time and when are the young plants pricked out?

The right time for sowing

Foxgloves can be sown in both spring and summer. It can be sown in cold frames in early spring and in pots in late spring. The second option is to sow it between June and August. In practice, the second option is usually preferred.

Characteristics of the seed

Foxglove seeds are easily blown away by the wind. It is extremely small and light. Each seed is no larger than 0.5 mm. You should therefore be careful when sowing so as not to lose too many seeds. The seeds are light germinators and do not need to be stratified before sowing.

sowing execution

Thimble is easy to put on. It can be sown outdoors, for example in beds or in bowls or pots. The seeds are either spread and pressed or covered with a maximum of 3 mm of seed soil. In order to be able to distribute them better and more evenly due to their tiny size, it is advisable to mix them with sand.

If you plan to plant a large area with foxgloves, you should ensure that there is sufficient planting distance. It is important to keep a distance of 40 cm between the individual plants. A row spacing of 25 cm is sufficient (10 inches).

Place the seed pot or sow the seeds in a semi-shady place. The ideal germination temperature is between 15 and 18 °C (59-64F). Keep the soil moderately moist in the following weeks.

Prick out the young plants and plant them out

The young plants should be pricked out after three to four weeks. Later pricking out is not advisable due to their sensitive taproot. They are planted in a location that has the following characteristics:

  • partially shaded to shaded
  • cool to warm
  • nutrient-rich, humus-rich soil
  • good drainage
  • damp environment or high humidity

Tips 

Anyone who has already planted foxgloves in their garden does not need to sow this plant every year. It likes to multiply happily by self-sowing.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic