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The cultivation of the nasturtium – From Sowing to Planting

The cultivation of the nasturtium - From Sowing to Planting

The large nasturtium with its bright yellow to orange blossoms is the most common in old cottage gardens. The varieties with white, pink, or even black flowers, on the other hand, are largely unknown, although they are no less decorative than their well-known relatives.

The cultivation and care of the nasturtium is not difficult and should also be easy for garden beginners. Even if you choose a lush climbing variety, you should not fertilize your nasturtium at all or only sparingly if you want to enjoy a rich bloom.

Sowing nasturtiums

You can sow nasturtiums outdoors from around mid-May. Since it is not frost-hardy, you should wait until the ice saints are over. The relatively large seeds can easily be planted individually or in pairs. The distance between the plants should be about 20 to 30 cm (7-11 inches).

Cover the seeds with about one to two centimeters of the soil, because the nasturtium belongs to the dark germs. Always keep the seeds well moist, then the first seedlings can be seen after about 10 – 20 days.

If you would like to see the nasturtiums blooming in your garden very early, then you should prefer them on the windowsill or in the greenhouse as early as March. Always put two to three seeds in a pot, cover them with soil and keep the seeds moist at all times.

Plant out nasturtiums

You should definitely wait until after the ice saints, around mid-May, before planting your nasturtiums. Otherwise, the tender shoots could fall victim to the last night frosts. The planting distance varies considerably depending on the variety chosen. You can plant bushy variants next to each other in matching colors, long climbing ones can also grow together or use a common climbing aid.

The essentials in brief:

  • Sow outdoors from mid-May
  • Preference in the warm from March
  • Plant out only after the ice saints
  • Possibly a climbing aid for varieties with long shoots

Tips

For balcony planting, there are very beautiful small varieties of nasturtium with a large variety of flower colors.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic