Home » What to do if nasturtium does not bloom? reasons & measures

What to do if nasturtium does not bloom? reasons & measures

What to do if nasturtium does not bloom? reasons & measures

When you plant nasturtiums in your garden, you certainly expect them to bloom profusely. And rightly so. It is not for nothing that the large nasturtium with its bright yellow-orange flowers belongs in practically every cottage garden.

The flower of the nasturtium

The flower of the nasturtium is not only extremely decorative but also very tasty. Like all other parts of the plant, the flowers also contain mustard oil glycosides, which makes them taste very spicy and a little hot.

They are also very healthy, they are effective against bacteria, viruses, and even fungi. Their most common areas of application are respiratory diseases and urinary tract infections.

Why doesn’t the nasturtium bloom?

Actually, there are only two reasons why the nasturtium does not bloom. Either she got too much fertilizer or not enough sun. Nasturtiums are easy to care for when they are in the right place.

It likes a sunny to semi-shady location and rather poor soil. Although it also grows in full shade, it may not bloom as lavishly there.

Here’s what you can do about it

If too much shade is the reason your nasturtiums are not blooming, then consider if there is anything you can do to help. It may be enough to prune some branches that are creating too much shade. You may be able to plant your nasturtiums in a more suitable location.

If you have fertilized too much, then in the future do without fertilizer altogether. If possible, swap out some of the soil around your nasturtium. Use nutrient-poor soil mixed with some clay and/or sand. Nevertheless, you will need a little patience until your plant blooms more luxuriantly.

You can also support further flowering by regularly removing faded remains. Then the plant cannot put its energy into ripening the seeds, instead, it will produce new flowers.

The essentials in brief:

  • fertilize little or not at all
  • preferably no fully shaded location
  • regularly remove wilted flowers

Tips

By removing wilted flowers, you encourage the formation of new flowers.

I studied horticulture at the University of Guelph and in my free time I plant everything that has roots on a piece of land. The topic of self-sufficiency and seasonal nutrition is particularly close to my heart. Favorite fruit: quince, corner, and blueberry Favorite vegetables: peas, tomatoes, and garlic